Time to take a risk

Following my first achievement many months ago in what came to be a rather long and complimentary relationship between me and lots of knitted fabrics; I decided to make something knitted and fitted for someone else.  I had received so many compliments for my creations and also the various different fabrics I chose to use.  Whenever I wore this top my Mother in-law would comment on how lovely it was, the time had come to hatch my cunning plan (sneaky grin spread across my face).

The garment had been decided but I was unsure of the fabric, I decided to sit tight in the hope she would inadvertently point me in the right direction.   A few months later I made this top and following more compliments I became confident that this fabric would be the one.

The finished article ready and waiting

The finished article ready and waiting

I have to admit buying clothes (let alone making them) for other people is not a road I tend to venture down very often, it’s all about personal preference, style, colour etc, so you can imagine my turmoil (should I, shouldn’t I, maybe maybe not, what if I make a mess of it, what if she doesn’t like it?), the inner fight lasted for a while until I told myself to take a deep breath and do something out of my comfort zone and take a risk.

So the garment was created with shaking hands and put in a safe place, for this was to be a secret until Christmas 2012 – eek!  As it  turned out it was a great success and well received to my relief.   I have realised there is something very rewarding when making garments for other people, the personal touch cannot be replicated.   Having said that I am still quite self conscious about the whole thing and very nervous. So  I won’t be doing it again any time soon then you would assume…………..oh no, no, no, that would be far to easy, my next creation is for my husband  (my biggest critic)  watch this space folks!

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Stranger things have happened

Front ViewWell, I am back in the game as the saying goes. Following my recent disaster(s) my sewing ability felt like it was hanging in the balance once again but I moved on swiftly to ensure I didn’t give myself too much chance to ponder.  This time the fabric caught my eye first, on a website I have recently started using. The descriptions are always detailed and precise so I know exactly what I will get when it arrives.

Gathers & Twists

The centre comprises of three separate pieces to create the gathers and twists

Still focussing on the stretch fabric I had an idea of the type of top I wanted to make.  I already have a pattern with a twist in the centre which I adore so I decided I wanted something similar. With the help of my friend Google I was on the hunt to find it. Finally I chose Simplicity 1716 which features 2 different tops/dresses, with varying sleeve lengths, just the job.

Part Front & Back

Upper front attached to the back, I didn’t quite know what was going on there

It was relatively easy to make, although a little baffling half way through when I had fabric dangling from the front and couldn’t quite decide what the purpose was. It was all a bit strange at this point but it all came together nicely in the end including the sleeves; I love how they fit directly on to the armhole and drape beautifully from the shoulder.

Sleeves & Centre

I love how the sleeves drape

There you go, all in all a productive weekend restoring my confidence and faith in my sewing once again.  Next I will be moving on to my Donna Karan inspired creation, it will probably be a wee while before I return!

The garment of many tucks

Neckline

Front neckline with many tucks to create the shape

Front ViewThis garment is from the Butterick B5354 pattern, another easy top to make. the shape is created by the many tucks along the neckline.  The fabric is a medium weight polyester jersey, which was quite easy to sew for a change, previous stretchy fabrics I have dealt with have tended to have a mind of their own.

Once again the biggest difficulty I came across was the sleeves, another variation I haven’t had the pleasure of meeting previously, no gathering this time, the sleeves are attached to the armhole as a flat piece of fabric and the seam is sewn and attached to the garment last, I did have more sleeve than armhole for some reason, this could have been due to the give on the fabric.

The pattern suggests two different lengths, I chose the longer version, it also has long sleeves or no sleeves, another top I can wear for the day job.

I have given myself a bit of a challenge for my next project, as recent ones have been quick and relatively easy to finish, I suspect I won’t be posting on here for quite a while!

All about pink

Front RightWhat can I say, I don’t really need to say anything about the garment, as I have mentioned it previously in an earlier post. Left Front The fabric is a polyester jersey, to give added stretch and ensure the perfect fit.

Again, I was delighted when my daughter asked me to make something for her. I was told what colour to choose and it had to be off the shoulder without a strap (teenagers know exactly what they want these days).

A couple of hours later, the result: a pink, cheeky little number with a total cost £3.5o and a satisfied daughter, a good day all in all 🙂

Front Centre

A summer evening in the garden

Front ViewI decided due to the nice weather today I would venture into the garden to take pictures of my latest creation and do a full head shot too, I am being brave. This top is from the Butterick B4132 pattern. The material is a lightweight knitted viscose, perfect for the lovely weather. Continuing my quest to try anything that stretches and doesn’t need a zip, this one again is along a similar line as previous tops I have made recently. They all have facings on the inside to reinforce the neckline which produces a layered effect. BUT they all have their own little differences which continue to take me by surprise. SleeveIn this case it was the sleeves – oh how I loved inserting these sleeves (I know I have mentioned before but gathered sleeves are a bugbear of mine). Anyway I digress, these sleeves fitted the armhole beautifully, although I was a bit dubious when I first saw them. Sleeves in, time to relax – no – the underarms still needed sewing to the facing, lots of fiddling, and scratching of the head ensued but I got there in the end – I think, who knows, they look ok, so I’m going with it!

Just a little bit crazy revisited

This is the second time I have made this New Look 6940 garment. I had some leftover fabric from a previous top I made, so decided to make another everyday top (two for the price of one, I do love a bargain).

Front View

Without zips, pleats, or tucks it was simple and quick to make.  I am finding my gathering skills are coming along nicely.  This top has horizontal and vertical gathers through the centre, this being my second attempt at the horizontal gathers, I think they worked much better.  I do have to mention though that gathering sleeves is a bugbear of mine and subsequently I don’t feed I do the best job, I would much prefer to fit and wear a flat sleeve rather than all the puffiness on a garment of this nature.

The top has a centre back seam, a centre front seam and a v neckline which was steering towards round rather than v shaped once the bias tape was  added, I inserted a couple of stitches at the centre and the v returned 🙂

I think my next creation will again be one I have made before but the fabric will be more vibrant, there has been quite a lot of black recently, stay tuned.

A little less ordinary

Front ViewMoving on with my knitted material, I am on a role now and getting quite used to how defiant some fabrics can be. I bought this particular material before I had a design in mind. I thought it needed something slightly different, a bit out of the ordinary and a touch adventurous if I am honest. So a little off the shoulder number was just the job.

The top comprises of a gathered shoulder seam, inside half length facing and a casing with elastic around the underarm to keep it in place. I used bias tape again on the armhole. All in all it took me about four hours to make, not enough time for the fabric to start curling at the edges out of sheer boredom.

Now all I need is a night out so I can wear it 🙂Shoulder